My Reflection…

I feel the best way to represent what I have to say for this blog, is with help of some visual aids.

I am currently on my journey to becoming a teacher:

journey

 

While on this journey, I realize that on a daily basis, there are many questions, thoughts, concerns, feeling of all varieties, and happenings from all areas of my life, occurring and influencing me in many different ways, and many times intertwining with each other.   The blog entries reflect some of these, but definitely not all. So today, I am going to focus on things that influence me, and how one area of my life teaches me lessons that I can use in a different areas. So let us look at the visual below:

These are some of the major components of who I am, that help shape my educating and learning experiences, in the teaching field.

 

journey2

 

So the other day, I learned a lesson from one of the wisest individuals I know; my 5 year old. It happened when we were sitting in her room. We had snuck off to get away from the ruckus of the football game on TV. The Buffalo Bills were letting everyone down, and everyone was being quite vocal about it.

I sat on her bed, diligently working on Lesson Plans, while she built the Bills Stadium with Legos. I caught her glancing at me a couple of times, like she had something on her mind. Finally, she expressed it.

“So mommy, are you going to tell me what’s wrong?”

“Hunny, I’m just tired, that is all”

“Mommy, I can tell by your eyes that you are sad. Are you going to tell me why?”

I stopped and smiled at the familiar words, which usually came from my mouth, but now my daughter decided to use them on me.

So this is when the grad student/teaching part of my life came in. I know we want to model, as educators, what we want the students to do. So I realized I had to open up to my 5 year old about what was bothering, in hopes she would do the same, next time I ask her.

I told her.

I told her my feelings had been hurt, and I feared how it would affect me in a certain environment. My daughter looked at me, and then said:

“I’m sorry that happened to you. Hold on to it, remember how it made you feel, and don’t you ever treat somebody the same way. You are in control of yourself, your actions, and how you respond.”

I was caught off guard at her response. I just looked at her and felt like I was looking in the mirror at a much younger, much cuter, reflection of myself. She again had used my words on me, and she was right. She told me exactly what I needed to hear. She made me realize that I too need to be careful with how I say things, because I don’t know how it will affect someone else, especially a student.

Sometimes you need to take your own advice, I’m just lucky enough to have a smaller version of myself to remind me of that.

 

mia