The Get Real! Science Blog

Middle Schoolers and NGSS: Extending Thinking Beyond the Standards

Is it dangerous to eat an orange on a hot air balloon?

What a strange question. I mean, why would I even ask that? Let me contextualize it a bit more. Please watch the following video before you continue reading.

Now that you’ve watched the video, I’ll ask my question again: Is it dangerous to eat an orange on a hot air balloon? Think for a bit about it before you continue reading. A few probing questions to get you started:

 Are party balloons and hot air balloons made of the same material?
What about the liquid in an orange peel makes […]

By |February 2nd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Like a Bat

What would it be like to see the world like a bat?

Bats are truly fascinating animals, and not only because they are the only mammals who have wings. Bats also have a very unique way of perceiving (seeing) their environment. Even though bats have perfectly good eyes that they use to navigate their surroundings during the daytime (nope, bats are not blind), they don’t actually rely on them when they are hunting for food. You see, bats are nocturnal, meaning that they spend most of their waking hours during the night, when their eyes can’t actually be of much […]

By |February 2nd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Corgis: The Genetics Behind a Loaf on Legs

Corgis. They’re short. They’re compact. And they have the most beloved butts on the internet. It’s hard to imagine how the lovable little dwarf pooches could have the same common ancestor as the wolves that terrorize fairy tales.

It’s been common knowledge for thousands of years among humans that you can breed species of animals and plants in a way that selects for specific traits. It’s how corn transformed from a gross, starchy cobb to the sweet, golden vegetable it is today. It’s how wild mustard evolved into broccoli.

It’s easy to see that traits are inherited. It’s pretty common for […]

By |February 2nd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Implementing Innovation by Orlando

This week, my students and I completed a unit on newton’s laws, momentum and car safety. The ultimate goal of the units was to have students design and build

at least 3 safety features for a passenger (an egg) in a model car (lab cart), test it (hopefully surviving the crash), and then use their understanding of physics to explain how each feature intended to increase safety and reduce harm, and perform calculations that provide further evidence of their claims.

 

The unit began with a simple question:

“What do you think would be most harmful to a person’s body, a rear end […]

By |January 22nd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Implementing Innovation

This week, my students and I completed a unit on newton’s laws, momentum and car safety. The ultimate goal of the units was to have students design and build

at least 3 safety features for a passenger (an egg) in a model car (lab cart), test it (hopefully surviving the crash), and then use their understanding of physics to explain how each feature intended to increase safety and reduce harm, and perform calculations that provide further evidence of their claims.

 

The unit began with a simple question:

“What do you think would be most harmful to a person’s body, a rear end […]

By |January 22nd, 2018|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Master Teachers, AST, and Student Teaching

Hello good people! This week is Sydney and I’s turn to write the class blog. This past week we met once more with the group of Master Teachers and discussed student autonomy and how to bring more of it into the classroom. They provided us with a ton of resources that they’ve used in our own classroom (thanks if you’re reading this). We (the cohort) were also tasked with further investigating the footholds of Ambitious Science Teaching. Check out the rest of the cohort’s blogs to find out more. What is the most exciting, however, is that we will […]

By |December 3rd, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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EdTPA: The Awkwardness of Filming Yourself

This week, majority of the GR!S Cohort took the leap of fully taking over the classroom for the first time. Check out last weeks blog to see Kaitlin and Olivia’s recap of their experience. Overall, my experience was a fun rollercoaster. My nervous-cited feelings we at an ultimate high, but the minute I started my unit, it all went away. I realized that this is exactly what I want to do with my life. I felt comfortable, excited and happy- until I watched the videos of myself!!!
This week, I want to focus on a crucial part of edTPA- filming. […]

By |November 17th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Reflective Practice: A Weekly Recap from Kaitlin and Olivia

Weekly Recap
It’s been another busy and exciting week for the GR!S preservice team! We began the week with the opportunity to attend the Science Teachers Association of New York State (STANYS) annual conference here in Rochester, NY. Check out Sydney’s blog  for a recap on our experiences! 
For several of us, this week kicked off our mini-unit implementation: a series of lessons we have been developing over time under the guidance of our cooperating teachers. Check out James’ blog post on his experiences here! 

This week we, Kaitlin and Olivia, will report out on the first day of our mini-unit, as […]

By |November 12th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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The Value in “Flopping”: Day 1 Jitters, Stumbles, and Learning on the Spot!

Picture this: You’re standing in front of your class. It’s the first time you’re teaching as a student teacher in a real classroom. Students are somewhat paying attention, but they are distracted by other classmates. You’re trying to refocus them on the lesson, but you don’t want to yell at them. You’re getting frustrated, but you don’t want your first day to involve snapping at students.

What do you do?
From Rush Henrietta Senior High School, it’s Mr. Kostka reporting this week for GR!S. I wanted to report about the demos upon demos my student teacher has let me conduct […]

By |November 5th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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Rocks, ROC History, and the Nature of Science

Greetings! It is my (Danielle’s) pleasure to share with you the going-ons at East and Warner this week. I am not part of the teacher cohort, but I am a researcher on the GR!S team and will be offering a more outside-of-the-classroom perspective
At East
Over four days, GR!S accompanied eight classes on their field trips to the Gorge. This trip was the anchoring experience for the seventh grade science classes. However, it also served as an anchoring experience for the Theory and Practice course. In last week’s blog, James and Olivia talked about how the trip  situates scientific learning here […]

By |September 23rd, 2017|Class scribe post, Events|0 Comments

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Kicking Off a New School Year at East

Hello and Welcome to the 2017-2018 GR!S class blog! Our cohort is very excited to share our experiences this semester: and that begins with our journey at East. Join us (James and Olivia) as we explore pedagogy, advocate for change and work toward becoming reform-minded science educators who employ culturally responsive teaching and inclusive education practices.
East EPO Partnership with The University of Rochester
To provide a little background: The University of Rochester shares an Educational Partnership Organization (EPO) with East School in Rochester, NY. The mission of the EPO states:
“Our mission is to prepare all students for a successful […]

By |September 15th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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John Kessler Talks Climate Change to Chicago Sun-Times

John Kessler, a friend of the GRS program, was recently spotlighted and quoted in the Chicago Sun-Times regarding his work on the Great Lakes and climate change. He recently completed a week-long tour collecting data about microbes and their methane emissions in order to gather data about its impact on climate change. Given the current political climate, Dr. Kessler summarized his relationship with science in the following words:
There’s skepticism about science.  It’s our job to slowly and methodically go through and talk about science … and communicate what we know and don’t know.
You can read the full article by […]

By |June 19th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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