Last week, I wrote about the February 14th Parkland shooting and what the Parkland students were doing to fight for their rights to feel safe in schools. Since so much has happened in the past week since then, I thought I’d post some updates rather than edit my original post because I think staying up to date on this situation is more important.

Between February 14th and last Friday, the Parkland survivors had

1. Held numerous rallies for strict gun control

2. Held a CNN town hall

3. Changed the minds of certain lawmakers

4. Organized 2 protests

5. Inspired some long-time gun owners to join in the cause

6. Talked with the president.

7. Asked the Florida government to debate the issue of gun control and traveled all the way to Tallahasee

8. Inspired thousands of students, teachers, parents, and citizens to join the fight

What they’ve been up to lately:

1. Continue to talk to TV hosts, including Ellen

2. Continue to rally.

3. Got several huge companies like DICK’S and United Airlines to either stop selling dangerous guns or renounce their support of the NRA

4. Got thousands of people around the world and other companies to boycott companies that still support the NRA.

5. Got the main voice of the Parkland movement (Emma Gonzalez) more twitter followers than the NRA. (Her tag is @Emma4Change if you want to follow her)

6. Continued to get more and more support from students around the nation that are planning in participating in the protest. In some cases, a single individual from a school got the rest of the school to agree to participate.

7. Inspired a new campaign: #WhatIf, which asks students to submit videos discussing gun reform.

8. Politicians, including the President, are beginning to double down on what to do about gun control.

I believe they’ve accomplished more in two weeks regarding gun control and school safety than any lawmaker or politician has. Unfortunately, guns are still negatively impacting schools. Over the past week, 3 more gun related incidences have occurred at schools. If that is not proof that something needs to be done, I don’t know what is.

Another Thing to Consider

Recently, at the school I’m currently teaching at, we’ve discussed the recent shootings, and one article from the Source brought up an interesting point that I’ve been thinking about for a while: School shootings are incredibly rare in inner-city schools. The articleWhy Don’t School Shootings Happen in the ‘Hood’? cites a few reasons as to why this is:

  1. “When you come from the hood, even if you have no friends at school: you still feel a sense of connection to your neighborhood.” Shooters tend to be loners.
  2. “A black child is more likely to worried about going to bed hungry. So school can be a place of refuge, at least they can eat.”
  3. “If two black students get into a problem at school, they will usually fight a couple times before gunplay. If it escalates to gunplay, the problem stays between them, with an intended target. Furthermore, incidents occur outside, away from school.”
  4. There are higher security measures in inner-city schools, like metal detectors.

When we talked about this in school, students did say that the argument the article posed had valid points and that they did feel safer with the added security, especially the metal detectors. I can definitely validate that rural and suburban schools have very lax security. Maybe they could learn a few things from the inner-city schools. But what do you think? Let me know in the comments.